Mary EllisI am pleased to welcome Mary Ellis to my site today. Mary writes in several genres, including historical and Amish fiction. But my interview today will focus on her inspirational romantic suspense novels. She’s also a fellow Buckeye! Hello, Mary!

Which comes first when writing a mystery – plot, character, or setting?

Definitely setting. Once I find a town or neighborhood that inspires me, plot twists and characters start popping into my head.

I discovered that while reading What Happened on Beale Street. Memphis and its blues scene defines the story.

You write both romantic mysteries and cozy mysteries. What’s the difference?

I believe I’m the wrong person to ask this question. After reading several “traditional” cozies and talking to several cozy authors, I don’t think I’ve ever written a true “cozy.” Although my mysteries are often set in small towns and are “sweet” in nature, I always have at least two points of view (cozies are usually from one point of view) and I always write in third person. According to my editor and agent, cozies are usually written in first-person, something I have never done. I would describe my books as mysteries with romantic elements. I dare not describe them as romantic suspense because readers of those usually expect a far more sensuous story than I can deliver. So….if you come across a better definition of “genres”, please pass it along! Because after 25 published books…I’m still confused!

 What are some unique challenges to writing mysteries?

I’m usually a “plotter” by nature, but when I switched to mysteries from historical romance, I found plotting more necessary than ever, especially to maintain the book’s proper pacing. As “clues” to the whodunit are dropped in, each should be “bigger” and more important to the storyline than the last.  Frankly, I can’t see how a total “panster” can build the necessary suspense. Either you’ll reveal too much too soon, or you’ll land in the soggy middle where nothing much happens other than you increase your word count.  I’m certain some mystery writers can “wing it” successfully, but they must have better memory than me.

 What do you do to renew your inspiration when it is running low?

 Ahhh, finally an easy question!! I renew my inspiration with travel. One-hundred percent of the time, my story and characters have sprung from an area I found intriguing. It could be close to home like Ohio’s Amish country, an hour away, or perhaps several hours away like many Civil War battlefields. But lately I’ve been writing mysteries set in the South. Thus far, I’ve set my books in New Orleans, Memphis, Natchez and Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, Savannah, Charleston, and Pensacola. Keep in mind I live in Ohio. My current work-in-progress is set in St. Simons Island, GA, a place where I plan to spend the winter.

 What’s the most unusual source of inspiration you have ever used in your writing?

 I believe the most unusual source of inspiration was an overheard conversation in a lovely restaurant in the French Quarter of New Orleans. Okay, true confession time—I eavesdropped on a marital spat that became quite loud at times. My mind started working overtime with “what if the husband did this” and “what if the wife did that” during the rest of that vacation. Hopefully the couple resolved their difficulties and they are still happily married, but that spat gave me fodder for my first published mystery called, “Something Very Wicked.”

What a great story behind the story! 

What advice would you give to someone who wants to write mysteries?

 Read lots and lots of mysteries, in the various sub-genres. Find the niche you feel you can fit into, but don’t belabor the “rules” of the genre and sub-genre. I wrote and sold several mysteries that frankly my editor didn’t know how to pigeon-hole. But she loved the stories and published them anyway. Get a feel for what you want to write and then go for it. If you try to write exactly like someone else you won’t sell the book.

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hiding in Plain sight 4 (2)While working to locate her adopted client’s natural siblings, Kate Weller tries to prove her landlord’s father not guilty of murder before someone who wants her dead tracks her down.

Interested? Check out the link on Amazon.

Mary Ellis has written twenty-five novelsincluding Amish fiction, historical romance, and suspense. First in the series, Midnight on the Mississippi,was a finalist for the RT Magazine’sReviewer’s Choice Award and a finalist for the Daphne du Maurier Award for 2015. Fourth in the series, Sunset in Old Savannahhas been nominated for a Bookseller’s Best Award and the Daphne du Maurier Award for 2017. In August, Severn House released Hiding in Plain Sightbook one of Marked for Retribution Mysteries. In January Kensington will release her mystery novella, Nothing Tastes So Sweet,for the Amish Candy Shop Anthology. www.maryellis.net or www.facebook.com/Mary.Ellis.Author