Their Mirror Moment

Can a book have mirror moments for two main characters? I don’t see why not, especially if the two MC’s take turns telling the story. Click here to read more on what a mirror moment is.

What is their mirror moment? I see a rich-girl-poor-boy romance. ( I know the motorcycle is expensive, but I imagine the boy “borrowed” it from the garage where he works.) Maybe it’s when they must decide if they will conform to their social circle or dare to be different.

What do you imagine is their mirror moment?

Its Mirror Moment

Since a mirror moment is important for any main character, what would one be like for a nonhuman character? For an explanation of the mirror moment, click here.

I chose this picture because I like how the fox was photographed as if it was sitting for its portrait. What could its mirror moment be?

Perhaps deciding if he should continue life as a wild animal or trust a human that’s been leaving him food. Or maybe the fox is a human under a spell and while enchanted, the character sees her true self and must decided if she will remain that way or change.

How do you imagine its mirror moment?

His Mirror Moment

What is his mirror moment, the moment in the middle of the story when the main character decides what kind of person he is? For more explanation of the mirror moment, read my review of Writing Your Novel from the Middle by James Scott Bell.

Obviously, this young man is considering something. His expression is thoughtful, he’s fiddling with his mustache, and he looks like he’s watching, maybe even scrutinizing, something out of camera range.

What could his mirror moment be? Perhaps he’s debating his role in a relationship and he’s watching the other person. Here’s my inspiration:

Len, always the center of attention, always the life of the party.

Never bothered me before. I like being on the ouside, can’t attract criticism if no one notices you.

But now … Len tells the punchline, and the guys fall all over themselves laughing.

I have a chance to be in a spotlight. Not Len’s. He can keep his. I have a shot at one of my own. But do I want it?

Write Your Novel from the Middle by James Scott Bell

Since tackling my Work In Progress novel, I wanted to understand the purpose and importance of the middle in storytelling. So I was pleased to find Write Your Novel from the Middle by James Scott Bell.

At 84 pages, the book certainly wastes no space in explaining how to create the middle point of your novel and then writing backwards and forwards from it. Mr. Bell begins by explaining this approach will work for Pam Pantser, Paul Plotter, and Tammy Tweener. The key is the Mirror Moment, and it really is a moment, which come in the middle of the story. The main character (MC) reflects on what kind of person he or she is.

To make this moment meaningful, the writer must write a backstory for the character in the first half of the story and a transformation in the last half. Mr. Bell states that the moment is key because it’s what the novel is “really all about”.

He gives examples of mirror moments from books, like A Christmas Carol, and movies, like Lethal Weapon, Sunset Boulevard, and Moonstruck. The author also goes into details about story structure, like the three-act structure, and the components that make up that act. He also provides ways to ignite inspiration in your writing.

My trouble with his approach is that while I plot out the action of my chapters, a few chapters at a time, I don’t really know what my story is about until I write a large chunk of it.

In my WIP, I included a mirror moment without giving it too much thought. Now that I’ve read this book, I’ve gone back to examine that scene and see how I can improve it.

One thing I’ve learned about myself as a writer is that it’s sometimes hard for me to incorporate advice until I run into a problem. Such as I couldn/t follow Mr. Bell’s advice until I was knee deep in the middle of my novel.

Do you recommend a book for how to tackle the middle of a story? What is it? I’d love to find more books on this topic.

Her Mirror Moment

I’ve been giving a lot of thought about how to post prompts to inspire the middle of a story. In Write Your Novel from the Middle, James Scott Bell says that a main character should have a mirror moment in the middle, a time to reflect on his or her past and make a decision about the future that’s irrevocable. That decision determines his or her actions through the last half of the book.

I’ll go into more details about Mr. Bell’s book on in my next post. But if this teen or young woman is your main character, and she’s having her mirror moment, what is she facing?

It’s got to be something huge. The wind is tossing her hair, but she’s staring straight ahead, not bothering to brush it aside. She looks a bit scared, a bit determined, concentrating a lot.

Here’s my inspiration for her mirror moment:

This was it. I either trusted God or I didn’t. If I didn’t, I could go back to a life of fear and lies and running.

And if I did? I had no idea. At least the fear and lies and running were familiar. Leaving them behind made me head into a future of complete unknowns.

But He promised to be with me. God wasn’t a liar.

I stared at my so-called friends and my so-called parents, partying like it was any other party, laughing like nothing had changed. They were known, part of my fears.

My stomach crumpled. Unknown and God had to be better.

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