Valentine’s Day Prompt

So sorry this is late. I thought I’d scheduled it for yesterday morning, and it was still in draft.

I still wanted to do a Valentine’s Day prompt. The body language of the couple in this photo can inspire several different scenes. Do you think the couple is having a romantic moment? Or are they breaking up? Here’s mine:

I looked at the water. I had to look at something besides him. My breath seemed to scorch my throat.

“I had to tell.” His deep voice was almost a whisper. “Couldn’t keep hiding things from you.”

So he had to be honest now. How thoughtful. Hadn’t it occurred to him that being honest from the start would make life easier for both of us?

His fingers fumbled for my hand. I wanted to jerk it away but couldn’t summon the strength.

“Can you forgive me?”

Can she? Or maybe she can’t immediately and the story is about how she eventually does? Or the story can take a totally different direction. What do you think?

Click here for more romantic prompts.

Writing Tip — Writing in Time: Valentine’s Day as Writing Inspiration

heartw-3089409_1280I don’t read romance. Can’t stand the genre. I’ve tried to read historical fiction with romance in it and romantic suspense, thinking the history or the mystery would compensate for the romance. It never works. The romance either bores me or seems so unrealistic that I can’t push through to the end.

So here are five non-traditional suggestions on how to use Valentine’s Day as writing inspiration.

Junior High Dance

In junior high, most boys are finally realizing that girls aren’t icky, but they aren’t sure what to do about this revelation. A dance on Valentine’s Day following several characters as they negotiate the unknown territory of romance presents many opportunities for both comedic and dramatic plots.

New Love/ Old Love

An elderly, married couple help an engaged or newlywed couple having troubles on Valentine’s Day. For the elderly couple to have more impact on the younger one, I think they shouldn’t be related to them. The couples can be neighbors. The two very different milestones in theses couples’ lives offer great contrast for storytelling.

Bittersweet Love

Write a story following a widower or widow experiencing his or her first Valentine’s Day since the death of the spouse.

Humorous Love

Write about a married couple trying to enjoy a romantic date night and being constantly frustrated with interruptions.

Bad Valentine’s Day

If you really want to stand Valentine’s Day on its head, have a couple break up on Valentine’s Day. That sounds so sad, I’m almost sorry I suggested it. But if the break up kicks off the story, then the uncouple have a chance to find new relationships or become reconciled.

Now it’s your turn. How would you put a new spin on Valentine’s Day as writing inspiration?

 

 

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