Limerick Prompt

Because it’s National Humor Month and Nation Poetry Month, I wanted to combined the celebrations into one prompt and decided on a limerick prompt. Then I discovered I can’t write limericks. Haiku, yes. Acrostic poems, yes. Limericks–I can do the first two lines and get stuck. Here’s the limerick I started that was inspired by the photo:

There once was a lion and girl

Who decided to give friendship a twirl.

And that’s as far as I got. I even tried writing a limerick on my inability to write one:

There once was a writer in Ohio

Whose poetry made her sigh so.

I’m still stuck. I console myself with the fact that even gifted poets, like Lori Z. Scott, who will be guest blogging this week, have trouble with different poetic forms. She writes about her effort to tackle a sonnet.

If you can write limericks, please leave it in the comments below. Or if you get inspiration for finishing either of mine, I’d love to read it!

If limericks stump you like they do me, try last week’s spring acrostic prompt.

Spring Acrostic Prompt

I have two themes this month because April is National Humor Month and National Poetry Month. You’ll see prompts for both as well as a crossover! I have a spring acrostic prompt for today. I decided to reprint an acrostic poem I wrote for Easter a few years back. Please put your acrostic poem about anything spring in the comments!

Click here to read previous poetry prompts.

Writing Tip — Novels in Verse

blondw-1866951_1280If you are more comfortable with poetry than I am, you may want to tackle writing a whole novel in verse. This post from Almost an Author lists several novels in verse, covering a wide range of plots. The author recommends them to reluctant readers.

My oldest has had to read two novels in verse for school and doesn’t really like them. Perhaps it’s because my oldest is an avid reader and prefers series like Redwall and Guardians of Ga’Hoole. 

Have you read a novel in verse than you would recommend?

Monday Sparks — Writing Prompts: What’s Your Favorite Poem?

picture-book-w21983812_1280April is National Poetry Month here in the U.S., so my theme is poetry and figurative language.

What’s your favorite poem? I have several, but I can’t reproduce them here. That would be mostly likely a copyright violation. So I will list titles and authors below.

 

 

Monday Sparks — Writing Prompts

vintagew-1151776_1280I had never heard of tanka, a form of Japanese poetry, until I read this article on Almost an Author. It is a five-line poem, the first three containing the same syllables as haiku: 1st line — five, 2nd line — seven, 3rd line — five. The fourth and fifth lines of a tanka poem each contain seven syllables. The author notes that the themes in tanka are more varied than haiku, which concerns nature. As an exercise, the author recommends write “a haiku first and then” add “the last two lines as reflection on your subject.”

So I’ve tried it with the haiku I posted in last Monday’s Sparks.

In April. the sky

Cries. Out of anger? Sadness?

The earth send flowers.

Now I’ll add two more lines of seven syllables and turn it into a tanka.

All tears are worth their price if

Kindness and compassion grows.

Share your tanka below!

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