What’s the Relationship?

Here’s a prompt to exercise the fantasy side of your imagination. What’s the relationship between these three characters?

Londra handed the fey flame to Kiel.

“No one saw me.” She glanced back over her shoulder.

The fires of our enemy’s village shone faintly through the thick trunks of the ancient forest. I flapped my wings, but the breeze couldn’t make the flame even flutter.

Kiel transferred the torch to her left hand and held her right to Londra.

She shook her head. “I’ll slow you down.”

Snorting, I looked to Londra as Kiel said, “We can make it. We can’t leave you here.”

Her dark eyes wide, Londra stepped back. “You’re wasting time.”

I couldn’t speak in my present form. I focused and shifted into my born shape. “Londra, as your–“

So what is the relationship between Londra and the shape-shifting uni-pegasus? Her brother, father, fairy godmother?

I’d love to read how you would continue this scene!

For more fantasy prompts, click here.

What’s the Relationship?

My theme for February is love and friendship. So what’s the relationship between the four characters in this photo? Yes, I think the horses are characters. Here’s where my inspiration took me:

“You can pet them.” I held out my hand and patted Bailey on the forelock.

My cousin didn’t move, like he’d become part of the rock we were sitting on. “I don’t want to.”

I gritted my teeth. I’d showed Aiden everything, absolutely everything, he could do on the farm, and he didn’t want to do anything. But Mom said I had to be nice.

“They won’t bite.” I bet all city kids think horses bite.

Aiden slid off the rock and ran back toward the house.

“And he’s gonna be here all summer,” I told Bailey and his mom, Smudge. “What am I supposed to do with him?”

From here, I can take the story two directions. Which do you prefer?

Smudge tossed her head like she didn’t know either while Bailey nuzzled me.

or

“Well, if you let us say something to him,” said Smudge, “maybe we could help.”

For another character writing prompt, click here.

Winter Acrostic

Searching through my website, I discovered I’ve never had a prompts for a winter acrostic poem. So here’s your chance to flex your poetic muscles. I like acrostics because if it doesn’t rhyme, no one can say I did a bad job. Here’s mine:

S pell is cast.

N ow I’m five.

O nly snow

W orks this magic.

For more poetry prompts, click here.

Three Words for January

What three words for January would you use if you described a setting in a story placed in the month or wrote a poem about it?

The first scene of my YA mystery is set in mid-January in southeastern Ohio. I start the book on a sunny, cold day. The weather grows more gloomy as my main character encounters obstacle after obstacle, trying solve the mystery. The three words I had in mind were “cold”, “blue”, and “bright.”

Here’s the finished product:

The sun shone ice white in a clear sky so blue that it looked like an illustration in a hyper-cheerful picture book for preschoolers. But despite the sun’s dazzling appearance, not an ounce of warmth made it to the hilly streets. 

From A Shadow on the Stone

For more inspiration about January, click here for posts on winter weather, New Year’s Day, and other January holidays

What three words for January would you pick?

Winter Haiku

I haven’t had a poetry prompt in a long, long time, so here we go with a prompt for a winter haiku. My oldest took this photo when my family and I went birding on New Year’s Eve Eve. A flock of over a hundred swans milled about in a cornfield as we headed to Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area in Marion County. My oldest took this photo. I like the contrast between the white feathers, gray sky and black trees.

Black and white against

Gray. Winter strips the world to

Its elegant bones.

What does winter look like where you live? Of if it’s summer where you are, what the weather like? Leave your haiku about it in the comments.

If you’d like to try another form of Japanese poetry, check out my post on how to write tanka.

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